EPFL Magazine N° 24

ÉDITO

De la science et de l’éthique / On science and ethics


POINT FORT

CRISPR, au-delà de la génétique

dossier_sommaire

Une révolution dans le quotidien des chercheurs de l’EPFL


50 ANS DE L'EPFL

Rire et réfléchir avec des lauréats de l’Ig Nobel

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La place Cosandey au cœur des festivités du 50e


«J’imagine un campus qui soit exemplaire, un modèle de bonnes initiatives dans le futur»


ACTUALITÉS SCIENTIFIQUES

Un nouvel appareil pour mesurer l'eau contaminée par le fluorure

news_sommaire

Un transformateur pour passer des réseaux AC à DC


Echecs et intuition sont de précieux ingrédients


Mieux évaluer la sécurité des bâtiments frappés par un séisme


INTERVIEW

Javier Martín-Torres prépare la vie sur Mars

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VU ET ENTENDU SUR LE CAMPUS

Drôles de bêtes

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CAMPUS

EPFLoop à nouveau dans la compétition

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«La tendance naturelle d’un chercheur est de ne pas partager ses données»


Des consultations infirmières de premier recours


Les étudiants peuvent bénéficier des conseils des diplômés


Elisez la meilleure start-up


PLUME: la bibliothèque met en ligne ses collections patrimoniales


Un nouveau fonds de l'EPFL récompense neuf idées open science


Une politique open access pour l’Ecole


«Il n’y a pas deux cultures séparées, l’une scientifique et l’autre humaniste»


EPFLinnovators turns PhD students into genuine entrepreneurs


La beauté des ratés

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Diversity: from theory to practice and analysis


Easter Island as search field for EPFL students in architecture


Slackampus is back for the third edition


LECTURE

La sélection des libraires

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CULTURE

Exposition sur le bureau d'architecture Case Design de Mumbai

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C’est bientôt les Printemps de Sévelin


Le livre Dia-Logos présente les origines et l’impact de l’œuvre de Llull


AGENDA

Les événements à venir


ÉVÉNEMENTS

Les points forts des 50 ans de l’EPFL

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CAMPUS

EDUCATION


Easter Island as search field for EPFL students in architecture


Paolo Tombesi, full professor in architecture, tells us about the “System Rapa Nui – Superstudio 2018”, the first edition of an ambitious three-year course aimed to address the environmental challenges of Easter Island.

Rano Raraku Moai quarrying site. © Tombesi, 2017

Can you describe the project? 

Architecture is usually considered separate from engineering, urban planning, material science, environmental design, regional development. What would happen if we interpreted the word architect differently, almost as a verb in fact – to architect? It is in part to answer this question that, from 2018, the ENAC School has started directing the focus of Superstudio, its final-year research studio of its entire cohort of over 100 students, towards the investigation of the environmental challenges that characterize Easter Island. In collaboration with Easter Island’s local government and Chilean universities, Superstudio is set to articulate a response in three years.

EPFL students learn how to plant pineapples with local farmers. © Wehrle, 2019

Can you describe the project? 

Architecture is usually considered separate from engineering, urban planning, material science, environmental design, regional development. What would happen if we interpreted the word architect differently, almost as a verb in fact – to architect? It is in part to answer this question that, from 2018, the ENAC School has started directing the focus of Superstudio, its final-year research studio of its entire cohort of over 100 students, towards the investigation of the environmental challenges that characterize Easter Island. In collaboration with Easter Island’s local government and Chilean universities, Superstudio is set to articulate a response in three years. 

What did the students do when they travelled over there in January 2019? 

In the second part of Superstudio, half-way through the winter semester, students worked in groups to outline the possible terms of a regional development policy for the island, ostensibly aimed at connecting, socially as well as physically, the issues affecting the full sustenance of the territory at a macro scale. A group of 18 students travelled to Easter Island for a week, so as to lay out, in a well-attended public forum, the visions articulated in Lausanne and receive feedback from the local constituencies. The result of the ensuing discussions will work as the basis for the work to be carried out in Superstudio 2019. The students took the visit as an opportunity to meet with island residents, activists and operators, experience the place, understand the context, and thus verify the validity of their initial assumptions.

Standard building construction on Easter Island. © Tombesi, 2018

Why is Easter Island a good context to work on for students in architecture? 

It is an ideal place to study in the context of modern environmental science, planning and technology. On the one hand, it represents a living community subject to all the social and economic pressures or tensions of a developing, multi-ethnic, connected, contemporary society. On the other hand, it has to deal with this condition while existing in a minuscule pocket of land lost in the middle of an ocean, which also happens to be of world heritage status and thus in need of preservation. Through remoteness and scarcity, Easter Island brings emphatically together sustainability, culture, energy, material science, engineering, health, farming, housing, waste, pollution, recycling, traditions, craft, and much more. Architecture, here, means the architecture of the system.


ENAC Communication

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